Mersey Schematic

Mersey-Forth


The Mersey-Forth catchment is in the north-west of Tasmania. It uses water from four main rivers – Fisher, Mersey, Wilmot and Forth. Lakes high in the Western Tiers feed the rivers below and in turn the power stations.

The Mersey–Forth catchment is a run-of-river system, which means water flows to power stations directly from a river, and cascades through a series of power stations. This means the same water is used to generate energy multiple times.

Rowallan Power Station

Lake Rowallan is the major storage for this catchment and supplies the Rowallan Power Station. Water flows to Lake Parangana.
Date commissioned 1968
Generating capacity 11 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Rowallan Power Station and Dam
Rowallan penstock from the dam to the power station
Rowallan Dam spillway

Fisher Power Station

Water from Lake Mackenzie flows through canals, tunnels and pipes to the Fisher Power Station. The water drops 650 metres to Fisher then runs into Lake Parangana.

Date commissioned 1973
Generating capacity 46 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Pelton hydropower
Fisher Power Station
Fisher Power Station_Inside the station
Fisher Power Station flume_The first stage of the water's journey
Fisher Power Station_Intake structure

Parangana mini-hydro

Water needs to be released from Parangana Dam down the Mersey River for environmental reasons.

The Parangana mini-hydro was built in 2002 to generate energy from this environmental flow before it entered the Mersey River.
Date commissioned 2002
Generating capacity 0.85 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Parangana Mini Hydro at the foot of the Parangana Dam
Parangana Mini Hydro_Tailrace
Parangana Mini Hydro_The mini turbine inside the station

Lemonthyme Power Station

Water from Lake Parangana is transferred west via tunnels to Lemonthyme Power Station. The water runs into Lake Cethana.
Date commissioned 1969
Generating capacity 54 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Lemonthyme Power Station and tailrace
Lemonthyme Power Station_Inside the station
Lemonthyme Power Station_Penstock carrying water to the station

Wilmot Power Station

Water from Wilmot River is stored at Lake Gairdner in the Wilmot Dam. Water is transferred by tunnel, pipeline and penstock to Wilmot Power Station and then flows to Lake Cethana.
Date commissioned 1971
Generating capacity 32 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Wilmot Power Station
Wilmot Power Station_Penstock with a steep drop
Wilmot Power Station_Looking up the penstock from the station
Wilmot Power Station_Aerial view of the penstock

Cethana Power Station

Waters from the four Mersey–Forth rivers meet at Lake Cethana where the water runs through the underground Cethana Power Station. It then flows into Lake Barrington.
Date commissioned 1971
Generating capacity 100 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Cethana Power Station_Entrance to the station
Cethana Dam
Cethana Power Station_Access tunnel

Devils Gate Power Station

Devils Gate Dam holds water in Lake Barrington, which is used in Devils Gate Power Station. The water continues its flow to Lake Paloona.
Date commissioned 1969
Generating capacity 63 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Devils Gate Power Station and dam
Devils Gate Dam crest
Devils Gate dam_Lake Barrington
Devils Gate Dam under construction

Paloona Power Station

The power station uses water stored in Lake Paloona. It is the last power station in the Mersey–Forth catchment before it flows out to Bass Strait.
Date commissioned 1972
Generating capacity 31.5 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Kaplan hydropower
Paloona Power Station and dam
Paloona Dam
Paloona Power Station_View from the dam
Paloona Power Station tailrace
© Hydro-Electric Corporation 2018