131028 Derwent Schematic

Derwent


Construction of the Derwent hydropower scheme began in 1934 and the last power station was commissioned in 1968.

There are two sections in the Derwent hydropower scheme – the upper and lower. This is because of the difference in how the water is stored in the sections. Visually the scheme resembles a Y shape.

The upper section of the scheme uses larger, deeper lakes for water storage than the lower section. The four main power stations in the upper section release water when it is needed to generate electricity. The upper section is formed from the Nive River system in the east and the Derwent River system in the west, making up the top of the Y.

The lower section is called run-of-river, which means water flows to power stations directly from a river, and cascades through a series of power stations. This means the same water is used to generate energy multiple times. There are six power stations in the lower section and they use water from the Derwent River multiple times. The lower section forms the ‘tail’ of the Y.

Butlers Gorge Power Station

The power station is supplied by the water stored at Lake King William. Water then flows to Tarraleah Power Station.

Date commissioned 1951
Generating capacity 12.7 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Butlers Gorge Power Station_Entrance to the power station
Butlers Gorge Power Station_Inside
Butlers Gorge Power Station sits at the foot of Clarke Dam
Butlers Gorge Power Station_Clarke Dam spillway
Butlers Gorge Power Station_The spillway and tailrace as seen from the top of Clarke Dam
Butlers Gorge Power Station_Historic gate at Clarke Dam

Nieterana mini-hydro

Nieterana is the Aboriginal name for little brother. This mini-hydro station sits alongside ‘big brother’ Butlers Gorge Power Station and was commissioned in 2004. When additional turbines were added to Tarraleah Power Station, a second canal needed to be built to carry enough water from Lake King William to make full use of all turbines. Nieterana was built at the base of Lake King William to make use of the water flowing through the second canal.

Date commissioned 2004
Generating capacity 2.2 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Nieterana Mini Hydro building
Nieterana Mini Hydro_Turbine

Lake Echo Power Station

This is the first power station on the eastern side of the ‘Y’. Water flows from Lake Echo to Dee Lagoon and on to Tungatinah Power Station.
Date commissioned 1956
Generating capacity 33.5 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Lake Echo Power Station
Lake Echo Power Station_Canals and flumes bring the water from the lake to the penstocks
Lake Echo Power Station_The penstock is the last step in bringing the water to the power station

Tarraleah Power Station

Water flows from Butlers Gorge Power Station via a series of tunnels, canals and pipes to Tarraleah. The water drops 290 metres through penstocks (steel pipes) to the power station. The water from the station meets with water from Tungatinah Power Station and flows to Lake Liapootah.
Date commissioned 1938-51
Generating capacity 93.6 MW
Number of turbines 6
Type of turbines Pelton hydropower
Tarraleah Power Station_Looking at the power station from the tailrace
Tarraleah Power Station_A canal delivers water to the power station
Tarraleah Power Station_A flume delivers water to the power station
Tarraleah Power Station_Pipeline looking down to the surge towers
Tarraleah Power Station_The drop of the penstocks to the power station
Tarraleah Power Station_The sheer drop of the penstocks to the power station

Tungatinah Power Station

Water is brought together from various lakes and lagoons to Tungatinah Power Station through natural and built systems. Once through the station, the water flow meets with water from Tarraleah and flows to Lake Liapootah.
Date commissioned 1953-56
Generating capacity 142.2 MW
Number of turbines 5
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Tungatinah Power Station_Entrance
Tungatinah Power Station
Tungatinah Power Station_Inside the power station

Liapootah Power Station

This is the first power station in the lower run-of-river system and it is where the cascade effect begins. Water from Lake Liapootah runs through to Liapootah Power Station and continues to Wayatinah Lagoon.
Date commissioned 1960
Generating capacity 87.30 MW
Number of turbines 3
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Liapootah Power Station
Liapootah Power Station_Liapootah Dam
Liapootah Power Station_The Liapootah Tunnel

Wayatinah Power Station

Water from Wayatinah Lagoon flows through to Wayatinah Power Station, continuing to Lake Catagunya.

Date commissioned 1957
Generating capacity 45 MW
Number of turbines 3
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Wayatinah Power Station_Inside
Wayatinah Power Station_Penstocks that bring water to the power station
Wayatinah Power Station_The Wayatinah surge tower

Catagunya Power Station

Water from Lake Catagunya flows into Catagunya Power Station and then on to Lake Repulse.
Date commissioned 1962
Generating capacity 50 MW
Number of turbines 2
Type of turbines Francis hydropower
Catagunya Power Station
Catagunya Power Station_The flume that connects the lake to the power station
Catagunya Power Station_Catagunya Dam under construction 1957-61
Catagunya Power Station_Catagunya Dam nearing completion

Repulse Power Station

Water from Lake Repulse turns the turbines at Repulse Power Station and then continues to Cluny Lagoon.
Date commissioned 1968
Generating capacity 29.1 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Kaplan hydropower
Repulse Power Station and dam
Repulse Power Station_The curved Repulse Dam wall

Cluny Power Station

Water from Cluny Lagoon flows into Cluny Power Station and then on to Lake Meadowbank.
Date commissioned 1967
Generating capacity 19.7 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Kaplan hydropower
Cluny Power Station
Cluny Power Station_Cluny Lagoon in the background

Meadowbank Power Station

Meadowbank Power Station is the last in the run-of-river system. Water continues its journey along the Derwent River and eventually out to sea.
Date commissioned 1967
Generating capacity 43.8 MW
Number of turbines 1
Type of turbines Kaplan hydropower
Meadowbank Power Station and dam
Meadowbank Power Station_Inside
Meadowbank Power Station_The multiple arch of Meadowbank Dam
© Hydro-Electric Corporation 2018